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Migration

ReliefWeb

When Shakila* arrived at a UNFPA Women Friendly Space she was tired and traumatized. Having fled the violence in Myanmar's Rakhine State, the 36-year-old Rohingya refugee needed urgent medical services for the sexual violence she had suffered.

Hauwa Madu, 13, is so happy to be able to attend school and has big plans for the future.  © UNHCR/Rahima Gambo
UNHCR

Tears tumbled down the cheeks of 13-year-old Hauwa Madu as she recalled the death of her father three years ago at the hands of one of the world's most feared terrorist groups.

UNHCR

 At home in the Darfur region of Sudan, Hosna's family were farmers and herders. Like every other young woman she knew, she got married and had a family. Then war broke out and armed men raided her village.

UNFPA

An "unprecedented" flow of Rohingya refugees is crossing the border into Bangladesh, with an estimated 370,000 pouring across the border since 25 August to escape the latest violence in Myanmar's Rakhine State.

UNHCR

An estimated 73,000 women, children and men have arrived in Bangladesh after trekking for days to flee violence.

UNHCR

"I decided that I was going to try to convey some of the lessons that I'd learned about being a human being from the refugees to people around me in my community" Credit: Odessa Rae Kate Daudy is a London-based artist who created 'Am I My Brother's Keeper?'

ReliefWeb

Rome — Over the past three years, IOM Italy has seen an almost 600 per cent increase in the number of potential sex trafficking victims arriving in Italy by sea. This upward trend has continued during the first six months of 2017, with most victims arriving from Nigeria.

UN News Centre

The United Nations migration agency today said that perhaps 80 per cent of Nigerian migrant women and girls arriving on Europe's shores in Italy could potentially be sex trafficking victims, spotlighting the horrific levels of abuse and violence migrants face along their arduous journeys for a better future.

A migrant gestures from behind the bars of a cell at a detention centre in Libya, Tuesday 31 January. Photo: UNICEF/Romenzi
UN News Centre

A senior United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) official is calling the routes from sub-Saharan Africa into Libya and across the sea to Europe one of the "world's deadliest and most dangerous for children and women," as the agency reported that nearly half of the women and children interviewed after making the voyage were raped.

UN News Centre

The highest United Nations official tasked with advocating against the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war urged today Libyan authorities to protect migrants from rape and other human rights violations.

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