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Viet Nam

 Trin Gim, Ung Hoa District, South of Hanoi.
UN Women

When Trin Gim first started her biogas digester business, many members of her community raised their eyebrows. In the little district of Ung Hoa, located south of Viet Nam’s capital, Hanoi, villagers were not accustomed to seeing a woman take the reins of a business. But eight years later, Trin Gim has achieved not only financial success, but has played a role in a larger fight in Viet Nam against the devastating impacts of climate change.

Giang Thi So’s daughter-in-law stands before her home, where she lives in with her husband, their two children and Mrs. So. She married Mrs. So’s youngest son at age 18 and couldn’t afford to go to school after her primary education.
UN Women

Women and girls from ethnic minority and across Viet Nam are especially vulnerable to violence and discrimination, both because of their gender and restrictive social roles and expectations within their homes and communities, as well as their ethnicity. They also lack access to services and economic resources, such as land and financing, even more than non-ethnic and non-indigenous women. Until recently, one of the barriers to adequately addressing their needs and challenges was the lack of data about their experiences.

FAO

From 2012 to 2016, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization, with the support of the International Fund for Agricultural Development, worked with governments in four countries in Asia to help them develop pro-poor policies and approaches to better manage risks and vulnerabilities faced by smallholder farmers.