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Education

Eno Ekanem, 15, is one of more than 80 participants in the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in August 2018.
UN Women

More than 80 girls from 34 African countries attended the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for 10 days in August 2018. The camp served to launch the African Girls Can CODE Initiative, a joint programme of the African Union Commission (AUC), UN Women Ethiopia and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Xhoana Vranici, Spartak Kosta and Kleodora Elmasllari (left to right) are among the first group of journalism students in Albania to have followed a specific course on how to report trafficking of women and girls  Photo: UN Women Albania/Yllka Parllaku
UN Women

Spartak Kosta is a third-year journalism student at the University of History and Philology in Tirana, Albania. He was among the first group of students to take a new university course on the reporting of trafficking of women and girls. The educational course was developed at the recommendation of a UN Women monitoring report. The study finds that journalists often write shallow trafficking stories that lack deep analysis and use unethical language with regards to victims.

Martha Alicia Benavente
UN Women

Martha Benavente, from Tucurú, a small municipality in Guatemala trained for six months to become a solar engineer, and she is bursting with energy. She can’t wait to start building solar lamps so that her community can have sustainable energy at last. One solar lamp could sell for up to 200 Quetzals, a lucrative business opportunity for a woman in a traditionally male-dominated field.

UNHCR

Alinesa fled Myanmar with her family 26 years ago and found safety in the south-eastern Bangladeshi coastal district of Cox's Bazar. She grew up there in Kutupalong refugee settlement, taking advantage of educational opportunities she was denied back home.

Hauwa Madu, 13, is so happy to be able to attend school and has big plans for the future.  © UNHCR/Rahima Gambo
UNHCR

Tears tumbled down the cheeks of 13-year-old Hauwa Madu as she recalled the death of her father three years ago at the hands of one of the world's most feared terrorist groups.

UNHCR

 At home in the Darfur region of Sudan, Hosna's family were farmers and herders. Like every other young woman she knew, she got married and had a family. Then war broke out and armed men raided her village.

UNFPA

Elizabeth Ayumpou Balang is a teacher at a nursery and primary school in Rumbek, a town in central South Sudan. It is her dream job, but it did not come easily. Like many girls in South Sudan, Ms. Balang was married, and became a mother, while just a teenager.

UNHCR

The stairwell is the only place they could find with enough space and seclusion for them to study - just one example of their determination to overcome the odds and achieve academic success.

UNICEF

ADEN, Yemen - Thirteen-year-old Hosson is a ninth grade pupil at 26 September School in Malla district, Aden. She is one of the top performing students in her class, and loves to teach younger children maths. But despite her academic success, she is regularly bullied by her classmates.

UNFPA

LUSAKA, Zambia - "I have seen girls become pregnant, become victims of violence and become HIV-positive, and I don't want to become one of those girls," said 13-year-old Lydia Mwelwa, a student at Kabulonga Basic School in Lusaka, Zambia's capital. "I'm happy they have taught us in school how we girls can protect ourselves," she added.

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