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Girl child

UNFPA

LILING, China - Not long ago, Wen Xiujuan was swept up in a romance. Against the wishes of her parents, she moved to the small village of Liling, 300 km from her hometown, to marry a young man named Yang Liu. They lived happily with Mr. Liu's parents, who hoped the couple would have a son.

UNFPA

DARA'A, Syrian Arab Republic - With the crisis in Syria soon to enter its ninth year, the people of Dara'a Governorate face especially harrowing conditions, with hostilities killing civilians as recently as July. Dara'a residents continue to require life-saving aid, including the full spectrum of health assistance.

UNFPA

Damboya, ETHIOPIA/New York, UNITED NATIONS - Tadelech Ermias remembers the ridicule she faced when she refused to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM), which was considered a requirement for brides in her community. "It was inconceivable then for a girl to get married without being cut," she said.

UN News Centre

A teacher holds up a drawing of an adolescent girl who has just been caught unawares by her first menstruation cycle, while at school. She's addressing neat rows of young women sitting in class, in the town of Bol, in Chad.

UN Women

Jessica Bennett is gender editor at The New York Times and has recently led an exciting multi-media project releasing on the International Day of the Girl Child (11 October), "This is 18". It shows what life looks like for girls turning 18 in 2018 around the world, captured through photographs,

Eno Ekanem.
UN Women

Fifteen-year-old Eno Ekanem was among 80 girls from 34 African countries who attended the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on 24 August 2018. The camp marked the launch the African Girls Can CODE Initiative, a joint programme of the African Union Commission, UN Women and the International Telecommunication Union.

Eno Ekanem, 15, is one of more than 80 participants in the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in August 2018.
UN Women

More than 80 girls from 34 African countries attended the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for 10 days in August 2018. The camp served to launch the African Girls Can CODE Initiative, a joint programme of the African Union Commission (AUC), UN Women Ethiopia and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

UNHCR

When she first arrived in Jordan as a refugee from Sudan five years ago, Waed was painfully shy, refusing to talk to anyone outside her family. Now, sprinting around a basketball court flinging passes and shouting encouragement to her teammates, she says she is unrecognizable from the girl she once was. Waed attributes her transformation to Reclaim Childhood, a non-profit sports programme for refugee and local girls in Jordan.

Salia, now 18, tends to animals to provide for herself and her family. Just two years ago, Salia thought she would be a child bride.
UNFPA

Two years ago, 16-year-old Salia Shemsu waited to be married off. Like many young girls in Ethiopia, it was only a matter of time before she would need to leave her family for a husband. Then an opportunity she never expected arrived. A local announcement called for young people to join an entrepreneurship programme. Salia responded immediately. Salia’s district is among 30 in Ethiopia where a joint UNFPA-UNICEF programme is now empowering vulnerable adolescent girls and boys to support themselves and make healthy decisions – by providing them with the knowledge and skills to do so.

Mariéme Jamme, a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader with students at Morneau Shepell Secondary School in Kakuma
UNHCR

Mariéme Jamme, who received no education until she was 16, is now a technology entrepreneur with a mission to train young women. Mariéme is one of 16 World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders (YGLs) on a visit to Kakuma, and the Kalobeyei settlement in north-western Kenya, to meet refugees and host communities.

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