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Girl child

UN Women

Jessica Bennett is gender editor at The New York Times and has recently led an exciting multi-media project releasing on the International Day of the Girl Child (11 October), "This is 18". It shows what life looks like for girls turning 18 in 2018 around the world, captured through photographs,

Eno Ekanem.
UN Women

Fifteen-year-old Eno Ekanem was among 80 girls from 34 African countries who attended the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on 24 August 2018. The camp marked the launch the African Girls Can CODE Initiative, a joint programme of the African Union Commission, UN Women and the International Telecommunication Union.

Eno Ekanem, 15, is one of more than 80 participants in the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in August 2018.
UN Women

More than 80 girls from 34 African countries attended the first Coding Camp in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for 10 days in August 2018. The camp served to launch the African Girls Can CODE Initiative, a joint programme of the African Union Commission (AUC), UN Women Ethiopia and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

UNHCR

When she first arrived in Jordan as a refugee from Sudan five years ago, Waed was painfully shy, refusing to talk to anyone outside her family. Now, sprinting around a basketball court flinging passes and shouting encouragement to her teammates, she says she is unrecognizable from the girl she once was. Waed attributes her transformation to Reclaim Childhood, a non-profit sports programme for refugee and local girls in Jordan.

Salia, now 18, tends to animals to provide for herself and her family. Just two years ago, Salia thought she would be a child bride.
UNFPA

Two years ago, 16-year-old Salia Shemsu waited to be married off. Like many young girls in Ethiopia, it was only a matter of time before she would need to leave her family for a husband. Then an opportunity she never expected arrived. A local announcement called for young people to join an entrepreneurship programme. Salia responded immediately. Salia’s district is among 30 in Ethiopia where a joint UNFPA-UNICEF programme is now empowering vulnerable adolescent girls and boys to support themselves and make healthy decisions – by providing them with the knowledge and skills to do so.

Mariéme Jamme, a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader with students at Morneau Shepell Secondary School in Kakuma
UNHCR

Mariéme Jamme, who received no education until she was 16, is now a technology entrepreneur with a mission to train young women. Mariéme is one of 16 World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders (YGLs) on a visit to Kakuma, and the Kalobeyei settlement in north-western Kenya, to meet refugees and host communities.

ReliefWeb

"It's a crime. It's like wiping a person away because you take everything away from them." (KII - Women's Rights Advocate, Kandahar) Child marriage in Afghanistan persists at rates that suggest at least one in three young girls will be married before they turn 18.

On 8 May, the HeForShe Flash Tournament brought togehter women's soccer teams from eight universities in Mexico.
UN Women

In recent years, women athletes in what have traditionally been known as “male sports," like soccer, have gained more recognition in Mexico. Initiatives such as the creation of the MX Female League for women soccer players (2017) has facilitated this progress, but also, because women in Mexico are beginning to demand equal conditions and pay in the world of sport.

Fatimata writes and draws in her school notebooks inside her parents' tent. Behind her, piled up, are the mattresses and blankets that would have served as her dowry.
UNHCR

Fatimata, 12, had a narrow escape after resisting an arranged marriage, but her case reflects a wider problem among Malian refugees in Mauritania.

UNFPA

Sara* was 17 when she found out she was pregnant. Living in a rural village in the Comoros, she carried the entire pregnancy in secret, and then gave birth in a hospital bathroom. "Our society does not accept to get pregnant out of wedlock," she explained recently to UNFPA.

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