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Refugees & IDPs

Intesar Hassan, 20, Syrian refugee woman learned to be a hairdresser through aworkshop at the Oasis Center for Resilience and Empowerment of Women and Girls in the Azraq refugee camp.
UN Women

1.3 million refugees are currently hosted by Jordan, a country that continues to demonstrate humanitarian leadership in the Syrian refugee crisis. In 2012, UN Women opened its first Oasis— a centre for refugee women and girls to access emergency aid and specialized gender-based violence services at Za’atari refugee camp in northern Jordan. Over time, the scope and impact of the Oasis model has expanded to encompass multi-sectoral services that build women’s resilience and empowerment. Currently, UN Women operates four Oasis centres in two Jordanian camps: Za’atari and Azraq.

Children run towards the sprawl of Domiz 1 camp in northeastern Iraq, where UNFPA-supported women’s and youth centres provide support and care for Syrian refugees.
UNFPA

While the number of child marriages occurring among Syrian refugees in Iraq is not available, research conducted among Syrian refugees elsewhere suggests a link between the poverty and instability facing displaced families like Aysheh’s, and rising pressure for girls to get married. Feeling helpless, Aysheh sought help from the UNFPA-supported Zahrat Al-Yasamin women’s social centre in the camp.

UNHCR

"The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too." So said Rose Schneiderman, a prominent trade union leader of the early 1900s. That's the motto of Bread and Roses, whose founders Sneh Jani and Olivia Head believe in helping refugee women to flourish through training and employment.

UNHCR

On a cold Saturday afternoon at a packed cultural fair in New Delhi, hundreds of visitors check out stalls selling traditional arts and crafts, clothes, furniture and food.