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UNICEF

Watch how these refugee girls make their own sanitary napkins at the Rohingya refugee camps in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

UNICEF

Azima, 16, wants to change perceptions about people living with HIV and AIDS in Uzbekistan. Read her full story: https://blogs.unicef.org/blog/hiv-darkness-light-story/ 

International Day of the Girl Child
11 October 2018

    Girls are a source of energy, power, and creativity—and they can drive change and help build a better future for us all. Yet, most girls continue to face challenges, violence, and discrimination that prevent them from realizing their full potential and rights.

    Commemorated annually on 11 October, the International Day of the Girl puts a spotlight on the needs and challenges girls face around the world, while advocating for girls' empowerment and the fulfillment of their human rights.

    Mariéme Jamme, a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader with students at Morneau Shepell Secondary School in Kakuma
    UNHCR

    Mariéme Jamme, who received no education until she was 16, is now a technology entrepreneur with a mission to train young women. Mariéme is one of 16 World Economic Forum Young Global Leaders (YGLs) on a visit to Kakuma, and the Kalobeyei settlement in north-western Kenya, to meet refugees and host communities.

    UNICEF

    Monique McDonald has come a long way from being a teenage survivor of sexual abuse. She was raped repeatedly by her uncle between the age of 12 to 15 years. But today she is a vocal ‘Mentor Mom’ working for the Jamaican NGO EVE for Life that supports and empowers survivors of sexual violence, providing mentoring programmes for young women, some of whom are living with HIV/AIDS. 

    UNICEF

    Weddings are supposed to be joyous and festive occasions, but this one is anything but a fairytale. About 15 million girls will be married as children this year - their right to a childhood ripped away. This video produced with Bridal Musings, one of the world's most influential wedding blogs, aims to put a spotlight on this grim reality.

    ReliefWeb

    "It's a crime. It's like wiping a person away because you take everything away from them." (KII - Women's Rights Advocate, Kandahar) Child marriage in Afghanistan persists at rates that suggest at least one in three young girls will be married before they turn 18.

    Adolescent girls take a selfie with their smartphone at a "Lifeskills" event in Union Development & Culture Community Centre in Djibouti in 2018.

    Around 30 teenagers aged 15 to 19 were newly infected with HIV per hour in 2017, according to a new UNICEF report. Of these, two-thirds were girls.

    “This is a crisis of health as well as a crisis of agency,” said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore. “In most countries, women and girls lack access to information, to services, or even just the power to say no to unsafe sex. HIV thrives among the most vulnerable and marginalized, leaving teenage girls at the centre of the crisis.”

    Fatimata writes and draws in her school notebooks inside her parents' tent. Behind her, piled up, are the mattresses and blankets that would have served as her dowry.
    UNHCR

    Fatimata, 12, had a narrow escape after resisting an arranged marriage, but her case reflects a wider problem among Malian refugees in Mauritania.

    A three-year-old and her father outside of the school building in Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya.
    UN News Centre

    There are 92 countries which lack national policies ensuring that new fathers get adequate paid time off, to spend with their newborn babies. "Positive and meaningful interaction with mothers and fathers from the very beginning, helps to shape children's brain growth and development for life, making them healthier and happier, and increasing their ability to learn," said UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore.

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